Biogaz Europe 2018

Venice 2022 - 9th International Symposium on Energy from Biomass and Waste

 

 

Event Date

From 2022-11-21 to 2022-11-23



Event language

English

 

 

The production of energy from alternative sources and its impact on climate change are among the main strategic tools implicated in the sustainable development of society, particularly in this period where geopolitics and dependence on energy have become such an important issue.
Numerous types of biomass and wastes contribute towards the production of energy and reduction in the use of fossil fuels by means of biological, chemical and thermal processes. Existing biomass and waste to energy technologies are currently undergoing rapid development. Despite growing interest in the use of these technologies however, in many countries their implementation is still limited.
The aim of the Venice Symposium is to focus on advances made in the application of technologies for energy recovery from biomass and waste and to encourage discussion in these fields.

 

 

 

 

Description

THE TOPICS: 


1. POLICIES, STRATEGIES AND REGULATIONS Regional, National and international approaches, EU Strategies and directives, Legal responsibilities. 

2. WASTE-TO-ENERGY AND CIRCULAR ECONOMY Circular economy is predominantly oriented towards material valorisation. However, waste to energy can play an integrated role, both in terms of biogas generation and energy valorisation of non-recyclable waste. 

3. BIOMASS AND WASTE CHARACTERISATION AS A POTENTIAL ENERGY SOURCE Municipal and industrial waste, Agricultural and horticultural waste, Hazardous waste, Clinical waste, Shredded car light fractions ("car fluff”) etc., Analytical and monitoring parameters. 

4. SOURCE SORTING OF MATERIALS FOR WtE CONVERSION Source separation has important effects of waste-to-energy options: food waste selective collection can support an efficient biogas generation through anaerobic digestion; residual MSW can result in a higher LHV. Transient scenarios of source separation must be managed carefully in order to avoid mismanagement. 

5. RENEWABLE FUEL (BIOGAS, BIODIESEL, BIOETHANOL, LIQUIFIED GAS, ETC.) Production processes, Quality, Technologies, Handling and storage, Residues management, Products and processes used to refine fuels from alternative feedstocks (biomass, waste, biogas, etc.). 

6. BIOLOGICAL WASTE TO ENERGY (ANAEROBIC DIGESTION, MICROBIAL FUEL CELL, BIOFUEL) Appropriate technologies for different organic substrates, Processes, Operation, Gas treatment and utilization, Treatment of residues (digestate, wastewater), Analytical and monitoring parameters. 

7. REFUSE-DERIVED FUEL/SOLID RECOVERED FUEL (RDF/SRF) Characterisation and quality, Production, Handling and storage, Thermal utilisation, Co-combustion, Residues. 

8. THERMAL TREATMENT (COMBUSTION, PYROLYSIS, GASIFICATION AND OTHERS) Processes, Energy utilization, Technologies, Efficiency, Upgrading of existing plants, Corrosion and Operation problems, Gas cleaning, Ash treatment and utilization. 

9. THERMOCHEMICAL LOW TEMPERATURE CONVERSION PROCESSES The valorisation of biomass as a fuel source can be limited by some unfavourable properties (low heating value, high moisture, low energy density, etc.). These properties can affect transportation and handling costs, storage, combustion quality. Low-temperature thermal treatments can modify these properties supporting the energy valorisation. 

10. ENERGY VALORISATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE AND P REMOVAL FROM ASHES Final treatments of sewage sludge can be based on specific energy recovery strategies. This scenario can be enriched by material recovery strategies: the recovery of Phosphorus from ashes is growing of interest taking into account the availability of natural reserves and the environmental impact of mine activities. 

11. INTEGRATED ENERGY SYSTEMS The concept of integrated energy systems refers to the implementation of strategies based on synergies allowed by the energy sector characteristics. Various energy fuels and carriers are available together with end-users belonging to sectors where carbon consumption and related emissions must be reduced. An efficient integration can avoid energy losses and waste. 

12. SITING OF PLANTS Both for biomass to energy and for waste to energy, the siting issue is one of the main problems to face; aspects of economic sustainability, social acceptance and environmental compatibility must be taken into account through an integrated approach that, today, can take advantage of a remarkable evolution of scientific methodologies and tools. 
 
13. SMALL WASTE TO ENERGY TREATMENT PLANTS Decentralisation is an option of growing interest in the sector of special waste. In some cases the quali-quantitative characteristics of the generated waste and the simplification of the authorisation pathway make interesting the adoption of processes suitable for small plants. 

14. WtE IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES Adaptation of technologies, Specific developments, Political and financial perspectives. 

15. ECONOMIC ASPECTS Capital and operational costs, Revenues, Financing. 
 
16. DECISION TOOLS LCA, Risk Assessment, Environmental impact assessment, Sustainability achievement, Energy and material balances. 

17. DIGITALIZATION AND AUTOMATION Digitalization and automation are more and more present in the technological sectors. Their potentialities in supporting biomass and waste to energy options must be taken into account for the success of a project. 

18. CLIMATE CHANGE AND SINK CO2 credits, Carbon balance, Reduction of GHG, Energy saving etc. 

19. ECOTOXICOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND HEALTH ISSUES Occupational health, Emissions and human exposition, Epidemiological studies. 

20. ARCHITECTURE OF WASTE-TO-ENERGY PLANTS Waste to energy plants (Incinerators, Anaerobic digester, Biorefineries, etc.) represent a significant volumetric footprint which can be used as a design tool for functional land planning. Designing criteria, Case studies. 

21. COMMUNICATION AND PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE Information campaigns, Public involvement, Mediation and consensus. 

22. INTEGRATED ENERGY CONCEPTS OF EMISSION TREATMENT PLANTS AND RENEWABLE ENERGY FACILITIES 

23. DECENTRALIZED INTEGRATED WASTE TO ENERGY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY CONCEPTS FOR RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS 

24. TANK OR TABLE: HOW TO SOLVE THE CONFLICT? 

25. CONFLICT BETWEEN USE OF LAND FOR ENERGY CROPS VS FOOD CROPS



Contact

Email *


Message *


Name *


Phone Number



Back to all events